Literary Birthday: Langston Hughes

Our first literary birthday for the week (and the month of February) is… Langston Hughes!

Hughes was a wonderful poet who constructed “musical” poetry dealing with many prevalent issues in the black community during the time, including (but not limited to) racism and poverty. Most people can quote “What happens to a dream deferred?” a phrase coined by Hughes in his poem “Harlem.” However, Hughes is responsible for so much more and should definitely be visited at least once in your lifetime.

Literary Birthday: Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes from Biography.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

James Mercer Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 – May 22, 1967) was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist from Joplin, Missouri. He was one of the earliest innovators of the then-new literary art form called jazz poetry. Hughes is best known as a leader of the Harlem Renaissance. He famously wrote about the period that “the negro was in vogue”, which was later paraphrased as “when Harlem was in vogue.”

His poetry and fiction portrayed the lives of the working-class blacks in America, lives he portrayed as full of struggle, joy, laughter, and music. Permeating his work is pride in the African-American identity and its diverse culture. “My seeking has been to explain and illuminate the Negro condition in America and obliquely that of all human kind,” Hughes is quoted as saying. He confronted racial stereotypes, protested social conditions, and expanded African America’s image of itself; a “people’s poet” who sought to reeducate both audience and artist by lifting the theory of the black aesthetic into reality. [via Wikipedia]

Since Hughes is widely known for his poem, I’ve thought to include two of my faves here:

Harlem (obviously)

What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore—
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over—
like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?

I, Too

I , too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed—

I, too, am America.

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